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Home Forums General Forums Engage The Faith Q&A: The Five Verses Almost Universally Misunderstood by Christians Today. Reply To: Q&A: The Five Verses Almost Universally Misunderstood by Christians Today.

  • Charles Hood

    Member
    July 21, 2020 at 8:36 pm

    Hello dear brother Timothy. It looks like dear brother Bercot is staying away from symbolic/apocalyptic/prophetic verses, which makes sense, and I will do the same.

    I have not yet looked at the five passages in your list, but if it is possible, I would like to add two more passages for dear brother Bercot to discuss:

    1) 1 Corinthians 3:12-15, with an emphasis on the last part of verse 15: “but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire”. What is Paul saying here at the end of verse 15? This sounds like a case where someone is judged to be worthy of eternal life with the Lord (they are not condemned to the lake of fire), but they will have no extra reward to enjoy in eternity. Verse 14 seems to say that someone who was more careful in the way they built upon the foundation during their lifetime will receive an extra reward to enjoy in eternity (the fact that such a person is saved is implied). I try to keep my Bible reading simple and straightforward, and this is the way I read and understand verses 14 and 15, but I would really like to hear brother Bercot’s thoughts on these verses, with an emphasis on the last part of verse 15, since I could be wrong.

    2) Romans 12:20, with an emphasis on the last part of this verse: “for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head.” I understand that Paul is quoting from the Proverbs of King Solomon (Proverbs 25:21-22), so I guess the question is this – what is Solomon saying here? I have always assumed that the phrase “thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head” is some kind of Hebrew idiom or other Hebrew figure of speech implying that your enemy which you treat so kindly will be deeply ashamed of their previous animosity and ill-treatment of you, and it is this deep, burning sense of shame that is likened to “coals of fire on his head”. I am not sure if I understand this correctly and I would really like to hear brother Bercot’s thoughts.

    Thank you and everyone else at THF for setting up this time with dear brother Bercot. May our Lord richly bless your labors for His kingdom.